The 2017 NFL Draft is just two weeks away. Today, we take a break from focusing on the prospects in this draft to evaluate some of the Indianapolis Colts’ recent drafts. More specifically, we will rank the team’s best draft picks, round by round.

Today, we rank the last 10 third-round draft picks that the Colts have turned in.

 

 

1. TY Hilton | 2012 – Pick 92 Overall | Wide Receiver | Florida International

Colts Career Stats: 374 catches, 5,861 yards (15.7 avg), 30 touchdowns, 48 punt returns, 480 yards (10.0 avg), 1 touchdown

Pro Bowl: 2014, 2015, 2016

All-Pro: None

You could consider this Ryan Grigson’s best draft pick as a Colt. Andrew Luck doesn’t count because he was going to be the pick regardless of who was calling the shots. All Grigson had to do there was not pick Robert Griffin III. Hilton played quite a bit as a rookie and has been a starter since his second season. He has become one of the best wide receivers in the entire NFL. Hilton’s three Pro Bowls and being the league’s leader in receiving yards in 2016 makes him the top choice.

 

 

2. Donte Moncrief | 2014 – Pick 90 Overall | Mississippi | Ole Miss

Colts Career Stats: 126 catches, 1,481 yards (11.8 avg), 16 touchdowns

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Moncrief has been a touchdown machine ever since his rookie year. He missed half of the 2016 season, which unfortunately delayed the breakout that many people see coming. He runs routes well and has great speed, even if the Colts don’t utilize it enough. If Moncrief can stay healthy for the majority of 2017, he should have his breakout.

 

 

3. Jerraud Powers | 2009 – Pick 92 Overall | Cornerback | Auburn

Colts Career Stats: 210 total tackles (11 for loss), 6 interceptions, 33 pass breakups, 1 fumble forced, 1 fumble recovered, 1 touchdown

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Powers was a very dependable corner for the Colts when he was actually on the field. But, that was his big problem; availability. He never played more than 12 games in a season in his four years in Indy, and he only played in eight games in his final season in 2012. It was time to move on. Powers has had better luck with health since leaving the Colts.

 

 

4. Dwayne Allen | 2012 – Pick 64 Overall | Tight End | Clemson

Colts Career Stats: 124 catches, 1,451 yards (11.5 avg), 19 touchdowns

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Allen’s career with the Colts started out very promising. In his rookie year, he displayed a great all-around game. He caught the ball well, blocked well, moved the chains and was a red-zone threat. And then, he suffered a hip injury after his only catch of 2013. Since then, he was almost never healthy. Allen’s blocking deteriorated, as did his sure hands. He became a very inconsistent player. Allen was signed to a new, four-year deal in 2016, but he was traded this offseason to broaden the role for fellow tight ends Jack Doyle and Erik Swoope.

 

 

5. Henry Anderson | 2015 – Pick 93 Overall | Defensive Tackle | Stanford

Colts Career Stats: 43 total tackles (5 for loss), 4 pass breakups, 1 fumble recovered

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Anderson was dominant as a rookie in 2015. Unfortunately, he tore an ACL mid-way through the season and has yet to become 100% as a full package. In training camp last August, I overheard Anderson mention that he had a similar injury in high school and it took him a while to conquer it mentally when he returned to the field. That may have been what was going on last season. He was also shut down for the year with more knee issues. If Anderson returns healthy, both mentally and physically in 2017, he could build off of what we saw in 2015 and become one of the league’s best interior defensive linemen.

 

 

6. Hugh Thornton | 2013 – Pick 86 Overall | Offensive Guard | Illinois

Colts Career Stats: 32 starts in 37 games, 10 penalties, 11.0 sacks allowed

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Thornton was a roller coaster of a player for the Colts. He was forced into starting as a rookie, which was not initially the plan. He played exactly like a third-round rookie – some impressive moments, but some missteps along the way as well. That is how he continued to play throughout his four-year stretch with the Colts. When he wasn’t on the field, he was usually dealing with injuries. He ended the last three seasons on Injured Reserve. Thornton did not play in 2016.

 

 

7. Drake Nevis | 2011 – Pick 87 Overall | Defensive Tackle | LSU

Colts Career Stats: 35 total tackles, 1.0 sack, 1 pass breakup

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Nevis never quite panned out for the Colts. Plus, he was overshadowed by another Colts defensive lineman from the class before, Ricardo Mathews. Nevis came in at a bad time for the Colts, dealing with a 2-14 campaign as a rookie. In 2012, the Colts switched to a base 3-4 defense, and Mathews translated better. Both were off the roster by 2013.

 

 

8. Le’Raven Clark | 2016 – Pick 82 Overall | Offensive Tackle | Texas Tech

Colts Career Stats: 3 starts in 8 games, 1 penalty, 1.5 sacks allowed

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Clark’s play on the field in the 2016 preseason looked like a demonstration on how to get Luck killed. Clark wound up starting the last few games of the year, and he actually did not play poorly overall. He had rough times here or there, especially in Oakland, but he looked like a developing offensive tackle prospect. Clark may be the front-runner for the starting right tackle job in 2017.

 

 

9. Kevin Thomas | 2010 – Pick 94 Overall | Cornerback | USC

Colts Career Stats: 33 total tackles (1 for loss), 3 pass breakups

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

Thomas could never overcome his injuries. He suffered a season-ending knee injury in his rookie year and was traded to the Philadelphia Eagles two years later. He appeared in just nine games in 2011, starting five.

 

 

10. D’Joun Smith | 2015 – Pick 65 Overall | Cornerback | Florida Atlantic

Colts Career Stats: 1 total tackle, 1 fumble recovered

Pro Bowl: None

All-Pro: None

One of the first known guys that head coach Chuck Pagano “stood on the table for” in the draft was Smith. At the time that he was drafted, Smith was a dark horse as one of the best corners in the draft. However, he dealt with a knee injury that he could not shake starting around training camp. He started his rookie year on IR-Designated for Return but only last four games before landing on IR for good. Smith also came from a very simplistic system at FAU. He was supposed to wind up as the replacement for Greg Toler but Smith never made it to his second season in Indianapolis.

 

 

 

 

Jake Arthur is the AFC South Division Manager, Indianapolis Colts Team Manager, Assistant Director of NFL Content and a Featured Analyst for Pro Football Spot. He is also a member of the Professional Football Writers of America. Follow @JakeArthurPFS on Twitter as well as on Facebook. Check out his other work HERE.

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Jake Arthur is a member of the Professional Football Writers of America. He is the Director of Fantasy Football Content for Pro Football Spot and a contributor forSB Nation's Indianapolis Colts website, Stampede Blue. Follow @JakeArthurNFL on Twitter!