The Green Bay Packers lost two of their own free agents on day one of the new league year.

After re-signing Nick Perry to a blockbuster deal, the Packers watched as Micah Hyde and J.C. Tretter signed elsewhere.

Hyde, Green Bay’s versatile defensive back, inked a five-year deal with Buffalo, while backup center Tretter signed with Cleveland.




Losing Tretter likely won’t sting too much for the Packers. Despite serving as a valuable backup, he only started 10 games over four seasons in Green Bay. Seven of those starts came in 2016, until an injury ended his season early.

His biggest asset remained his ability to play multiple spots on the line. Rumors swirled that if Green Bay lost T.J. Lang, Tretter could serve as the right guard. Now the team will have to look somewhere else if Lang departs. At center, the Packers still have a reliable, solid player in Corey Linsley.

Tretter wound up with the Browns, who gave him a three-year contract worth $16.75 million. He’ll start in the middle of a revamped Cleveland line.

The departure of Hyde will likely be more impactful, but the end result does not come as a surprise.

The Bills shelled out $30.5 million over five years, a price the Packers would not (and should not) have matched. Congrats to Hyde on cashing in, but Green Bay did the right thing in not paying him that much.

The more surprising part is that the Packers did not even make Hyde an offer. This might have been that Green Bay simply knew they couldn’t match other deals. But it remains interesting that the team didn’t even try when they desperately need secondary help.

Hyde leaving means the Packers have just three established corners on their roster. However, his role was limited to a part-time starter. Green Bay will miss his versatility, but Hyde would not have worked as a true outside cornerback. Paying what Buffalo paid him would have been a mistake for the Packers.

 

In other day one news, Green Bay also signed reserve lineman Don Barclay to a one-year deal. Barclay has struggled when he’s been on the field, but he gives professional depth to the line now that Tretter is gone.